What is the average salary for a travel nurse

If you have considered becoming a travel nurse, there are many factors that you should consider. Traveling halfway across the country is definitely something you should think about before doing it. If you are considering a career as a travel nurse, here are some tips for average salaries for travelers.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median salary for a registered nurse in the United States is $61,450 per year.

The median compensation for travel nurses is $1,000 per shift, though this can vary depending on location and employer. For example, some employers offer extra compensation for weekend shifts or holidays. The average pay rate for travel nurses is $40 per hour, which translates to an annual salary of $80,000 for full-time work (40 hours/week) over 52 weeks.

What is the average salary for a travel nurse

Introduction

When you are considering travel nursing, you want to know what your take-home pay will be and how it will differ from a staff position. As with any profession, there are many factors that go into this, including the specialty you choose to work in. The first thing to consider is the different types of nurse salary packages out there.

Travel Nurse Salaries

Travel nurse salaries are usually higher than the average salary for nurses in the same position. As a travel nurse, you could make anywhere from $30 to $60 per hour, depending on your specialty and experience level. If you take into account that travel nursing positions generally last anywhere between 2-24 weeks, this means that you could potentially earn anywhere from $2,000 to $6,000 during one contract!

The salary you get paid as a travel nurse depends on the following:

The salary you get paid as a travel nurse depends on the following:

  • Geographic location
  • Specialty (i.e., what type of nursing you do)
  • Experience level and length of time you’ve been working as a travel nurse

Here’s an example: Let’s say you’ve been working for three years and have done stints at facilities in California, Texas, North Carolina, Florida, Illinois and New York City. In this case, your experience level would be considered “advanced,” as opposed to someone who has only worked one year and is still considered “intermediate.” As such, they might not make as much money per hour—but their experience will lead them toward getting better assignments with higher pay rates over time. This can be true even if both travelers are matching on the same assignment!

Geographic location: A job in New York City will be different than one in Alabama.

Location is important because it affects the cost of living. The more expensive your area is, the lower your pay will be. Location also affects your quality of life and ability to save money.

Specialty: ICU travel nurse will make more money per hour than an ED nurse.

There are several factors that affect your pay rate as a travel nurse. The specialty you choose will impact how much you make, but it won’t always be the determining factor.

In general, ICU nurses make more money per hour than any other type of nurse. They also tend to get paid more than other specialties because they’re in demand and hard to find. If you decide to become an ICU travel nurse, expect your pay rate to be higher than what other types of nurses would earn for comparable hours worked over the course of a year or longer period of time (for example: ED).

Experience Level: A highly experienced ICU travel nurse will have a higher rate than a new graduate nurse working in another specialty.

Experience level is a major factor. A highly experienced ICU travel nurse will have a higher rate than a new graduate nurse working in another specialty.

Experience level can be seen as a proxy for skill level, productivity, reliability and quality of care, safety and on-the-job training. A veteran traveler is likely to be more skilled than someone who has just started their career or is transitioning from another field such as nursing home care or home health agency work.

The experience level of other travelers at that facility, if you’re splitting an assignment.

The experience level of other travelers at that facility, if you’re splitting an assignment.

If the facility is new and there are very few nurses staffing it, then it may be easier for you to get assignments there. However, if the facility has many experienced travelers who have been there for a while, it may not be such a good fit for you.

There are many factors that can affect your pay and your travel nursing salary is dictated by your experience, specialty and location.

There are many factors that can affect your pay and your travel nursing salary is dictated by your experience, specialty and location. The more experience you have, the more you can earn. This means if you’re new to travel nursing but have an excellent reputation for excellence in patient care, it may be possible for a facility to offer more compensation than another traveler with less experience.

In addition to being experienced and talented as a nurse, there are other factors that could improve how much money you make as a travel nurse:

  • Geographic location: What region of the country do you want to work in? You may earn more money working in Alaska or Montana than in New York City or California because housing costs are lower. If cost-of-living is important to you while travelling then choose where there are some great deals!
  • Specialty: Some specialties like pediatrics or cardiac surgery pay better than others such as psychiatry or radiology because they require extra training before becoming certified (and thus making them harder to find).

Conclusion

We hope that this article has helped you understand how much travel nurses make per assignment and some of the factors that influence their pay. If you’re considering becoming a travel nurse, feel free to apply online or give us a call at 800-933-6262. We would be happy to answer any questions you have about travel nursing salaries!

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